Les senyoretes del carrer d avinyó

Les senyoretes del carrer d avinyó

Les demoiselles d’avignon inspiration

Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon, originally titled The Brothel of Avignon)[2] is a large oil painting created in 1907 by the Spanish artist Pablo Picasso. The work, part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, portrays five nude female prostitutes in a brothel on Carrer d’Avinyó, a street in Barcelona. Each figure is depicted in a disconcerting confrontational manner and none is conventionally feminine. The women appear slightly menacing and are rendered with angular and disjointed body shapes. The figure on the left exhibits facial features and dress of Egyptian or southern Asian style. The two adjacent figures are shown in the Iberian style of Picasso’s native Spain, while the two on the right are shown with African mask-like features. The ethnic primitivism evoked in these masks, according to Picasso, moved him to «liberate an utterly original artistic style of compelling, even savage force.»[3][4][5]
In this adaptation of primitivism and abandonment of perspective in favor of a flat, two-dimensional picture plane, Picasso makes a radical departure from traditional European painting. This proto-cubist work is widely considered to be seminal in the early development of both cubism and modern art.

les demoiselles d’avignon controversy

El quadre pintat per Picasso que va donar pas al cubisme en l’art de la pintura, és fet a Barcelona quan Picasso vivia a prop del carrer d’Avinyó i per tant, el seu títol hauria de ser Les senyoretes del carrer d’Avinyó de Barcelona i no com és presenta internacionalment “Les senynoretes d’Avinyó”, nom posat pels francesos per a vincular-lo a la ciutat francesa d’Avinyó i desvincular-lo de Barcelona tot descatalanitzant-lo.
És l’obra cabdal de Picasso, el punt de partida del cubisme i la pedra angular del Museu d’Art Modern de Nova York (MOMA). Les senyoretes d’Avinyó (1907), l’obra que va transformar l’art modern trencant amb els valors tradicionals de perspectiva i composició, compleix 100 anys. I el MOMA ho celebra amb una exposició que examina el seu procés de creació.

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Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon, originally titled The Brothel of Avignon)[2] is a large oil painting created in 1907 by the Spanish artist Pablo Picasso. The work, part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, portrays five nude female prostitutes in a brothel on Carrer d’Avinyó, a street in Barcelona. Each figure is depicted in a disconcerting confrontational manner and none is conventionally feminine. The women appear slightly menacing and are rendered with angular and disjointed body shapes. The figure on the left exhibits facial features and dress of Egyptian or southern Asian style. The two adjacent figures are shown in the Iberian style of Picasso’s native Spain, while the two on the right are shown with African mask-like features. The ethnic primitivism evoked in these masks, according to Picasso, moved him to «liberate an utterly original artistic style of compelling, even savage force.»[3][4][5]
In this adaptation of primitivism and abandonment of perspective in favor of a flat, two-dimensional picture plane, Picasso makes a radical departure from traditional European painting. This proto-cubist work is widely considered to be seminal in the early development of both cubism and modern art.

les demoiselles d’avignon interpretation

Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon, originally titled The Brothel of Avignon)[2] is a large oil painting created in 1907 by the Spanish artist Pablo Picasso. The work, part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, portrays five nude female prostitutes in a brothel on Carrer d’Avinyó, a street in Barcelona. Each figure is depicted in a disconcerting confrontational manner and none is conventionally feminine. The women appear slightly menacing and are rendered with angular and disjointed body shapes. The figure on the left exhibits facial features and dress of Egyptian or southern Asian style. The two adjacent figures are shown in the Iberian style of Picasso’s native Spain, while the two on the right are shown with African mask-like features. The ethnic primitivism evoked in these masks, according to Picasso, moved him to «liberate an utterly original artistic style of compelling, even savage force.»[3][4][5]
In this adaptation of primitivism and abandonment of perspective in favor of a flat, two-dimensional picture plane, Picasso makes a radical departure from traditional European painting. This proto-cubist work is widely considered to be seminal in the early development of both cubism and modern art.

Les senyoretes del carrer d avinyó 2021

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